By-laws, orders, and rules, for the good government of the corporation of the London assurance. And, for the better carrying on their business of assurances of ships and merchandizes at sea, and going to sea, and lending money upon bottomree. And also, for assurance of houses and goods from casualties by fire; and assuring lives.

London, n.p., 1722.

4to, pp. 15, [1, blank]; two ink marks to the title-page, and a light damp-stain to the fore-edge of the title-page; a very good copy, disbound.

£1500

Approximately:
US $1940€1654

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By-laws, orders, and rules, for the good government of the corporation of the London assurance. And, for the better carrying on their business of assurances of ships and merchandizes at sea, and going to sea, and lending money upon bottomree. And also, for assurance of houses and goods from casualties by fire; and assuring lives.

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First edition of the by-laws of the London Assurance Corporation, which, along with The Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation, was constituted and granted sole rights, excepting private individuals, to the granting of assurance and bottomry by ‘The Bubble Act’ of 1720. The right to self-govern, reflected in the pamphlet offered here, was also granted in ‘The Bubble Act’ of 1720 which specified that after three years of control by Crown-appointed governors and directors, the members of the corporation would be free to set their own by-laws and elect their own leadership. The by-laws cover use of the company seals, company cash, the price of share transfers, registering probates of wills, making receipts and payments, company elections, absentee directors, directors taking ‘presents, fees, or rewards’, officers or servants taking ‘unwarrantable fees’, procedure for questions asked in general courts, procedure for addressing questions, the penalty for breaking the by-laws, and the yearly salary of governors and directors.

ESTC 187248 (erroneously dated 1712, some 8 years before the constitution of the Corporation), locating one copy only, at the Guildhall.

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