Les arts musulmans.

Paris and Brussels, G. van Oest, 1926.

4to, pp. 48, with 64 plates; a good copy, edges untrimmed, in the original printed wrappers; slightly soiled and rubbed, spine darkened; from the library of Robert Byron, with his ownership inscription (dated, at Constantinople, August 1926) in pencil on inside front wrapper.


US $120€97

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First edition, published in the series Bibliothèque d’histoire de l’art.

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