Fragmenta Regalia. Observations of the late Queene Elizabeth, Hir Times and Fauorites. Edited by Professor Roy E. Schreiber.

The Roxburghe Club, 2002.

£300

Approximately:
US $392€332

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Fragmenta Regalia. Observations of the late Queene Elizabeth, Hir Times and Fauorites. Edited by Professor Roy E. Schreiber.

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A classic of memoir literature, Sir Robert Naunton’s Fragmenta Regalia was written c. 1634, circulated in manuscript, and first published in 1641, since when it has seldom been out of print. This edition presents the authentic text for the first time, from the very manuscript that Sir Robert had made for Charles I, to whom it was actually addressed, and includes the substantial, hitherto unpublished commentary which Naunton intended for the King’s eyes alone. The text is accompanied by textual and biographical notes on all the dramatis personae by Roy E. Schreiber, Professor of History at Indiana University. The second volume comprises a facsimile reproduction of the manuscript.

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