An Early Breton Gospel Book. A Ninth-Century Manuscript from the Collection of H. L. Bradfer-Lawrence.

The Roxburghe Club, 1977.

£180

Approximately:
US $218€208

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An Early Breton Gospel Book. A Ninth-Century Manuscript from the Collection of H. L. Bradfer-Lawrence.

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This ninth-century manuscript was the oldest and most important in the collection formed by Harry Bradfer-Lawrence. The book was begun by Professor Francis Wormald. He discusses the manuscript’s antecedents, both Carolingian and Merovingian, and the marked influence of Tours that points to a Breton origin, and notes the Anglo-Saxon additions made in the tenth century. The death of both owner and author left the task unfinished.

Harry Bradfer-Lawrence’s son, Philip, invited Professor Jonathan Alexander to finish the book. Prof. Alexander added a long note on Breton Gospel books, and points to the Norman invasion of Brittany in 919 as the occasion of the manuscript’s removal to England.

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