Call it Sleep.

London: Michael Joseph, 1963.

8vo., pp. 446; original black cloth, stamped in gilt on spine; inevitable uniform browning to cheap paper, otherwise a fine copy in an remarkably bright unclipped jacket, showing only a hint of wear to spine ends.


US $348€283

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First English edition, first published in New York by Robert O. Ballou in 1934.

This single precocious masterpiece, originally published seventy years ago, is now generally regarded as the finest novel of Jewish immigration to America before and after the turn of the century.

In fact, so good was the novel, so rapturous its critical and popular reception, that Roth suffered over half a century of writer’s block before he was able to write another.

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