The Lady of the Lake … with all his Introductions and Notes, various Readings, and the Editor’s Notes.

Edinburgh, Robert Cadell, 1851.

16mo. in eights, pp. [2], 280, engraved title-page (foxed) by J. Gellatly after J. M.W. Turner; Mauchline binding in ‘Caledonian’ Tartan boards, red leather spine, gilt edges, a fine example. Stereotyped and printed by Stevenson & Company, 32 Thistle Street, Edinburgh.

£750

Approximately:
US $980€853

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