An Encyclopaedia of rural Sports, or, complete Account, historical, practical, and descriptive, of Hunting, Shooting, Fishing, Racing, &c. &c. … a new Edition, revised and corrected by ‘Harry Hieover,’ A. Graham, Esq., ‘Ephemera’, etc. etc.

London, Spottiswoodes and Shaw for Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1852.

8vo, pp. xiii, [1 (blank)], 1246; with wood-engraved title vignette and 576 woodcut illustrations by R. Branston after Alken, Landseer, Dickes, and others in text; a very good copy in contemporary half green morocco with marbled sides, borders filleted in blind, spine gilt in compartments with gilt morocco lettering-pieces, speckled edges, blue endpapers; spine slightly sunned, rubbed at extremities with a few minor scuffs, splits to joints; ownership inscription of J. Johnstone dated 1856 to title, bookplate of Sir Frederick William Stopford (1854–1929) to upper pastedown.

£275

Approximately:
US $333€325

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
An Encyclopaedia of rural Sports, or, complete Account, historical, practical, and descriptive, of Hunting, Shooting, Fishing, Racing, &c. &c. … a new Edition, revised and corrected by ‘Harry Hieover,’ A. Graham, Esq., ‘Ephemera’, etc. etc.

Checkout now

Second edition of Blaine’s comprehensive work on rural sports. First published in 1840, the Encyclopædia of rural Sports marks a considerable departure from Blaine’s earlier scientific texts on veterinary medicine, with sections on the history and philosophy of field sports, and on horse-racing, hunting, hawking, coursing, shooting, and fishing. It is nonetheless a useful guide to all aspects of rural sports.

Cf. Mellon 162 (first edition).

You may also be interested in...

ON ROYAL PAPER
POPE AND SWIFT UNWITTING ‘SUBSCRIBERS’
HUGHES, John.

Poems on several Occasions. With some select Essays in Prose. In two Volumes …

First edition of the principal collection of the author’s works, published posthumously and edited, with a long biographical preface, by his brother-in-law, William Duncombe. John Hughes (1677–1720) was educated at a dissenting academy where Isaac Watts was his contemporary. From an early age he devoted himself to poetry and letters, and was gradually drawn into the Addison–Steele circle where, as Samuel Johnson puts it, he was ‘received as a wit among the wits’; he contributed at least three numbers to the Tatler, seventeen to the Spectator, and one to the Guardian. Hughes also had a passion for music, and was a talented violinist. He championed the use of English verse for operas and cantatas, and many of his lyrics were set to music by such contemporary composers as Dr Pepusch. In the year of his death, he wrote a tragedy called The Siege of Damascus, which proved highly successful and remained in the repertory for the rest of the century.

Read more

THEODORE WILLIAM’S COPY [BERINGTON, Simon, adapted by Jean-Baptiste DUPUY-DEMPORTES.]

Memoires de Gaudence de Luques, prisonnier de l’Inquisition … Première [– quatrième] partie.

Second edition of this much expanded and altered translation of Berington’s celebrated utopian novel, Memoirs of Sigr Gaudentio di Lucca (1737). The Memoirs enjoyed immense popularity, undergoing at least twelve eighteenth-century editions in English and contemporary translations into French, German and Dutch. With the author thought to be George Berkeley, the great Christian idealist, ‘it attained to a rank and dignity comparable to that of the Republic of Plato, the Utopia of Sir Thomas More, and the New Atlantis of Lord Bacon’ (Lee M. Ellison, ‘Gaudentio Di Lucca: a Forgotten Utopia’, PMLA, L [1935], 494-509).

Read more