Les trois veritez. Seconde edition reveue, corrigée, & de beaucoup augmentée.

Bordeaux, Simon Millanges, 1595.

8vo., ff. [12], pp. 176, ff. [4], pp. 775, p. [1]; an excellent copy, unpressed, in the original vellum, small piece gnawed from fore-edge of upper cover.

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Les trois veritez. Seconde edition reveue, corrigée, & de beaucoup augmentée.

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Second, much enlarged edition of Charron’s first book, which sought to prove the existence of God, man’s need of religion, and – in the main part, with a heavy debt to Montaigne’s Christian scepticism – the truth of Catholicism against Protestantism.

Desgraves, Bibliographie bordelaise, no. 162. Tchemerzine, II, p. 244 (c).

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