Il Quadriregio. With an essay by B.H. Breslauer. Facsimile based on the edition printed in Florence in 1508.

The Roxburghe Club, 1998.

£375

Approximately:
US $480€426

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Il Quadriregio. With an essay by B.H. Breslauer. Facsimile based on the edition printed in Florence in 1508.

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This is the first facsimile reproduction of one of the greatest Florentine illustrated books of the Renaissance – Il Quadriregio is to Florentine book illustration what the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili is to Venetian. The only surviving work of Federico Frezzi (c. 1350–1416), bishop of Foligno, the text is an allegorical poem in the vernacular, describing a journey through four regions: Love, Satan, Vice, and Virtue. The Earl of Crawford’s copy, one of only two remaining in private hands, is reproduced here in its entirety. The prefatory essay, by Bernard Breslauer, not only treats the book, its remarkable publisher Piero Pacini, and its place in the history of Florentine book illustration, but considers how it has been assessed by the critics and art historians of the last hundred years.

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