Inventario privato. Prefazione di Giacomo Zanga. Disegni di Alberto Casarotti.

[Milan], Veronelli, [1959].

8vo, pp. 51 including 5 full-page illustrations after drawings by Alberto Casarotti; a very good copy in the original printed wrappers designed by Attilio Rossi.

£350

Approximately:
US $459€391

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First edition of the second published collection of poems by Elio Pagliarani (b. 1927), a member of the neo-avant-garde Gruppo 63. Pagliarani was the first of five poets to be anthologised by Alfredo Giuliani two years later in his important anthology I novissimi (1961), which in many ways can be seen as the launch of the Italian neo-avant-garde.

Gambetti-Vezzosi p. 329; Spaducci p. 206. OCLC records only two copies, at Yale and Brown.

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