Contributions towards a Dictionary of English Book-Collectors as also of some Foreign Collectors whose Libraries were Incorporated in English Collections or whose Books are Chiefly Met with in England.

London, Bernard Quaritch Ltd, 1969.

8vo, pp. [6 (half-title, verso blank, title, imprint on verso, index and illustrations)], 9-350; portrait frontispiece, colour-printed and monochrome illustrations and facsimiles in the text, some full-page; original brown cloth, spine lettered in gilt; fine.

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Contributions towards a Dictionary of English Book-Collectors as also of some Foreign Collectors whose Libraries were Incorporated in English Collections or whose Books are Chiefly Met with in England.

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A facsimile reprint of Quaritch’s series of profiles of bibliophiles, with brief lists of the treasures of their collections and notes on their dispersal at auction or in the trade, which remains a useful resource both for the history of book-collecting in Britain and for provenance research. Contributions towards a Dictionary of English Book-Collectors was originally published in fascicules between 1892 and 1921, and the contributors included F.S. Ellis, W. Carew Hazlitt, Alfred H. Huth and Robert C.G. Proctor – however, as Arthur Freeman states in his biography of Quaritch in the ODNB, Quaritch’s contributions were ‘largely ghost-written’.

Osler 7305.

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