Contributions towards a Dictionary of English Book-Collectors as also of some Foreign Collectors whose Libraries were Incorporated in English Collections or whose Books are Chiefly Met with in England.

London, Bernard Quaritch Ltd, 1969.

8vo, pp. [6 (half-title, verso blank, title, imprint on verso, index and illustrations)], 9-350; portrait frontispiece, colour-printed and monochrome illustrations and facsimiles in the text, some full-page; original brown cloth, spine lettered in gilt; fine.

£25

Approximately:
US $34€29

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Contributions towards a Dictionary of English Book-Collectors as also of some Foreign Collectors whose Libraries were Incorporated in English Collections or whose Books are Chiefly Met with in England.

Checkout now

A facsimile reprint of Quaritch’s series of profiles of bibliophiles, with brief lists of the treasures of their collections and notes on their dispersal at auction or in the trade, which remains a useful resource both for the history of book-collecting in Britain and for provenance research. Contributions towards a Dictionary of English Book-Collectors was originally published in fascicules between 1892 and 1921, and the contributors included F.S. Ellis, W. Carew Hazlitt, Alfred H. Huth and Robert C.G. Proctor – however, as Arthur Freeman states in his biography of Quaritch in the ODNB, Quaritch’s contributions were ‘largely ghost-written’.

Osler 7305.

You may also be interested in...

THE MOST AUDACIOUS FORGER WHO EVER LIVED FREEMAN, Arthur.

Historical Forgery in Romanophobe Britain: Robert Ware’s Irish Fictions revisited.

A new and particular account of the anti-Catholic and anti-separatist forgeries of Robert Ware, the seventeenth-century Irish antiquary, who has been called ‘the most audacious fabricator of historical documents who ever lived’. Ware’s formidable output of lively if malicious fictions has distorted Tudor and Stuart history, with remarkable endurance and reiteration, over more than three centuries – despite longstanding efforts at exposure and dismissal, which this study traces closely as well.

Read more

FREEMAN, Arthur.

Catullus Carmen 17.6 and Other Mysteries. A Study in Editorial Conflict, Eccentricity, Forgery, and Restitution. With a checklist of significant printed editions of Catullus in Latin, 1472-2005.

This partly historical, partly philological essay offers a general account of the early preservation, post-medieval recovery, and Renaissance evolution of the text of Catullus, with specific reference to one speculative reading in Carmen 17 (‘De Colonia’), and certain humanist twists and forgeries that accompanied its long editorial history.

Accompanying the narrative is a substantial bibliographical appendix that provides a checklist of significant editions of Catullus in Latin from 1475 to the present day, with brief notes of relevance and location.

Arthur Freeman is a rare book dealer and writer living in London. In 2014 Quaritch published his Bibliotheca Fictiva: a Collection of Books and Manuscripts Relating to Literary Forgery 400 BC – AD 2000. Catullus Carmen 17.6 is the second footnote to that book, following Julia Alpinula (2015).

Read more