SEREMBAN CELEBRATIONS
VICTORIA’S DIAMOND JUBILEE IN MALAYSIA

‘Diamond Jubilee Fund in account with The Sungei Ujong Treasury’ [repeated in Malay, Tamil, and Chinese].

[Seremban? 1897.]

Single sheet (506 x 341 mm), printed in English, Malay, Tamil, and Chinese; contemporary ink notes (identifying each language) to margin; creased where folded, somewhat worn with several tears (affecting a few characters of Chinese text).

£450

Approximately:
US $570€526

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‘Diamond Jubilee Fund in account with The Sungei Ujong Treasury’ [repeated in Malay, Tamil, and Chinese].

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A remarkable quadrilingual document, offering a summary of accounts for a Malaysian Diamond Jubilee Fund in English, Malay, Tamil, and Chinese.

The celebrations for Queen Victoria’s 1897 Jubilee included bonfires and fireworks, sports and medals, and refreshments and lodging for some of those taking part, as well as $487.45 ‘expended by Chinese community’ for ‘processions and decorations’, supported by a Government grant of $1000 and by public subscriptions.

Seremban, in the nominally independent state of Negeri Sembilan, had been under the control of a British Resident since 1874.

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